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Night Fishing Tips 101

Black crappie and white crappie. Slab stories and photos here.

Night Fishing Tips 101

Postby bobglen » Tue May 31, 2011 7:35 pm

Night fishing vs day fishing!
Night time is usually quite, calm and not hot as opposed to daytime. Very few boats, skiers you name it. By night fishing one can fish after work, and leave the weekends for the family outings.


Seeking advantage
Fishermen seek advantages to catching fish for food. The game fish try to use to their advantage the elements to catch their food. By providing a light where plankton or shrimp can congregate, thereby attracting game fish. Scientific research has proven that the food chain eyes are sensitive to colors blue and green. The reason is fish have lived in blue to greenish waters for centuries.



Image


Debate green vs white light
Many fishermen believe that green light is nothing but a way to market a new product. Universities around the globe has proven it is not a gimmick. Graph illustrates light penetration and light deflection that universities using satellites imaging to determine their findings.


Lights attract fish
Fishermen have know for long time that light tend to attract fish, shrimp and insects at night.
Green or blue light is the best choice but not necessary. Think of this way fish live in greenish to bluish waters, and it is better to present the color that they are accustomed to. If you have a light source that intense enough will work. Example: A white light will work because it is part of the blue and green color spectrum. The other side of the coin is that white will attract bugs, as opposed to green or blue lights. Despite the excellent brightness of above water lights a significant fraction of the light shining on the surface of the water is lost by deflection and thus will not be available to attract fish and their food chain.


Deflection, Penetration
Take a flashlight and at 45 degree shine the light on the water, you will see that the light rays
will bounce upwards into the trees. Very small amount of the light is absorb by the waters.
The same effect will happen underwater, the light will bounce from the underside of the waters
back down creating a mushroom effect.


Lanterns, headlights, fluorescent etc.
Many considerations and dangers need to be considered. Fums, battery draw, cost just to name a few. LED’s lights are becoming the most popular fishing light, for light penetration and cost effective to purchase per luminous. Led lights have a 50,000 (17 year) life expectancy, and are very rugged, with very little amp draw.
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bobglen
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Joined: Wed May 25, 2011 11:17 am
Location: Indiana

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